ATRÁS /  BACK

ATRÁS /  BACK

[ auto racing ] [ baseball ] [ bowling ] [ camping ] [ cock fighting ] [ cycling ] [ fishing ] [ golf ] [ hiking ] [ sports & horses ]

[ hang gliding ] [ jet skiing ] [ kayaking ] [ rappeling & rock climbing ] [ running ] [ scuba diving ] [ surfing ] [ swimming ] [ tennis ]

[ volleyball ] [ windsurfing ]


Scuba diving

[ scuba diving introduction ] [ sea life ] [ sunken artifacts and wrecks ] [ water conditions ] [ hot spots for diving ]

[ north ] [ east ] [ south ] [ west ] [ diving hot spots chart ] [ tours and charter operators ]


Scuba Diving Introduction

Underwater adventure-seekers will find the waters off Puerto Rico among the best in the Caribbean for scuba diving and snorkeling. Surrounding the Island under warm blue waters lie various pristine dive sites, populated with an assortment of amazing sea creatures, ledges, caves, walls, coral reefs and items of historical significance. This vast pool of  submerged wealth has gone largely unexplored.

 TOP

Sea Life

Following the rains, freshwater regularly streams down the mountains to the coast, and draws lots of fish to the area around our island. Here, an abundance of reef plants and sea creatures including eels, seahorses, turtles, barracudas, crustations, anemones and a wide variety of tropical fish, inhabit the coral reefs without the slightest concern over mans presence.  Dolphin, manatee and other pelagics frequently visit these waters as well.

 TOP

Sunken Artifacts and Wrecks

During season hurricanes frequently comb this region. In past centuries, without the benefits of modern-day forecasts, numerous vessels fell prey to rough seas. There's no wonder you can find just about anything from a sunken German sub to an aircraft down at the bottom of this quadrant. Sunken artifacts and wrecks marking some 500 years of Caribbean history lie waiting for you to uncover all along these waters.

 TOP

Water Conditions

Tropical rains cause water to flow from the mountains and carry dregs into the sea. Choppy waters from strong wind gusts also agitate sediments at the bottom of the ocean. These factors play a crucial role in the degree of visibility of the waters around Puerto Rico. On good days visibility can exceed 100 feet and water temperatures around 78'F (26'C).

 TOP

Hot Spots for Diving

Popular diving spots are located off Puerto Rico's coast from the Caribbean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean and from Culebra  Island to Desecheo Island. Our island's perimeter is marked by reefs that contour the shoreline, bays and inlets.

 TOP

North Coast

There are several places to dive from along the northern coast of Puerto Rico. From Isabela visitors can dive from the beach to nearby coral formations.  Just west of San Juan, Vega Alta's Cerro Gordo Beach has opportunity for shore diving and exploring off-shore reefs. If you're in San Juan,  you can dive off the beaches along the Condado area. Some of the major hotels there offer starter courses and with instructions for daily shore dives.

TOP

East Coast

Head east past Luquillo and right off Fajardo shores is a network of cays that include Icacos, Ratones, and Lobos. You'll find Palomino islet, the Cay Zancudo, Marina islet, and Isla de Ramon due south. All these areas including locations off Humacao have jump-off points. Here  a depth range from 20 to 75 feet presents a diverse topography of hard and soft coral, magma reefs containing small caves, channels and minor wall. Sea life is tropically colorful, abundant and the fish very bold.

 

About 18 miles east of Fajardo lies Culebra Island, and just below that Vieques Island. The coastal waters around these dive spots have virtually gone unexplored. There's plenty to see here including sunken wrecks.

TOP

South Coast

In the southeast quadrant of Puerto Rico, from Salinas coast, divers can chose to jump from shore and from boat to explore reef formations off shore. Further west you'll find Cays of shallow reefs that extend from Ponce to Tallaboa. These areas are choked with fish and other colorful sea life. West of Ponce in Lajas, several miles off the coast of La Parguera, a continental shelf sets the stage for more diving adventures. At a depth of 45 feet the foundation around this area slopes to about 90 feet, then drops several miles down forming a massive wall some 20 miles long. There's well over forty sites along this region alone. Further west, you'll find reefs off Guánica composed of soft and hard corals. There's also wall diving, and a chance to explore sub-trenches. 

TOP

West Coast
Along the western coast of the Island Aguadilla shores offer some land diving day and night off Crash Boat pier. You'll find a variety of coral and plenty of fish. Sponges are concentrated in these parts.

 

Located off the west coast mainland, the largely unexplored reefs off Desecheo and Mona are teaming with marine life. The coastal waters around these small sister islands are a diver's paradise and offer some of the most memorable diving experience you'll have on your visit to Puerto Rico. Located about nine miles west of Aguadilla and 12 miles west of Rincon, the uninhabited island of Desecheo contains a Federal Wildlife preserve, and is host to dozens of dive sites. Its well-preserved marine ecosystem makes this a unique diving spot for all underwater enthusiasts.  Among the list of highlights are the variety of hard and soft corals including large elkhorn. Caverns and a vast concentration of sponges, lobsters and manta rays are also abundant in these parts. Desecheo can be reached by charter boats from the main land.

 

Mona is located about 50 miles west of Cabo Rojo. The island is a nature refuge, managed by Puerto Rico's Department of Natural and Environmental Resources.  It has evolved into a well balanced ecosystem, with pristine shores and the clearest waters you'll find this side of the Caribbean. Marine life ranges from sea turtles to whales. Call 724-3724 or 721-5495 for more information on diving regulations here.

 TOP


The following is a diving hot spots lookup chart for quick referencing.

Hot Spots for Diving (Visibility and Depth given in ft=Feet and m=Meters. Meters have been rounded off)

Location

Dive Visibility

Depth

Description

Aguadilla

33-80 ft
10-24 m

25-70 ft
8-21 m

Land diving day and night off Crash Boat pier. Small wall diving with a variety of coral and plenty of fish and a concentration of sponges.

Culebra

40-90 ft
12-27 m

40-90 ft
12-27 m

Coastal waters have virtually gone un explored. There's plenty of sea life, reefs, caves, walls and sunken wrecks. 

Desecheo  

75-100 ft
25-30 m 

25-100 ft
l0-35 m
A divers' paradise. This uninhabited island has unexplored reefs teaming with marine life. Located 9 miles west of Aguadilla and 12 miles west of Rincon, Desecheo contains a Federal Wildlife preserve including a marine ecosystem, and dozens of dive sites. Features include hard and soft corals including large elkhorn, caves and a vast concentration of sponges, lobsters and manta rays. 

Fajardo

 

45-90 ft
14-27 m

20-75 ft
6-23 m

Off Fajardo shores is a network of cays that include Icacos, Ratones, Lobos and Zancudo. You'll also find Palomino, Ramon and Marina islets, due south. This area has a diverse topography of hard and soft coral, magma reefs containing small caves, channels and minor wall. Sea life is tropically colorful, abundant and the fish very bold. Some sunken wrecks.

Guánica

45-100 ft
14-30 m

20-110 ft
9-34 m

Reefs off Guánica are composed of soft and hard corals. There's also wall diving, and a chance to explore sub-trenches.

Humacao

63-125 ft
19-38 m

40-90 ft
12-27 m

Humacao have jump-off points off shore.  Has a diverse topography of reefs, caverns, minor wall. Sea life is tropically colorful, abundant and the fish very bold.

Isabela    30-50 ft
l0-20 m
20-50 ft
10-15 m
Dive from the beach to nearby coral formations.

La Parguera, Lajas

55-150 ft
17-46 m

48-115 ft
15-35 m

Offshore, the foundation of a continental shelf  begins at a depth of 45 feet then slopes to about 90 feet, before dropping several miles down. The wall is some 20 miles long. There's over forty sites along this region. Wall and reef diving available.

Mona 60-100 ft+
20-35 m+
20-100 ft+
10-35 m+
A nature refuge, managed by Puerto Rico's Department of Natural and Environmental Resources. Has a well balanced ecosystem, with pristine shores and the clearest waters. Marine life ranges from sea turtles to whales. Call 724-3724 or 721-5495 for more information.

Ponce

55-100 ft
17-30 m

20-115 ft
6-35 m

Cays of shallow reefs that extend from Ponce to Tallaboa. These areas are choked with fish and other colorful sea life.

Salinas    30-50 ft
10-20 m
20-50 ft
10-15 m
From Salinas coast divers can chose to jump from shore and from boat to explore reef formations off shore. 

San Juan

25-45 ft
8-14 m

30-90 ft
9-27 m

Dive off the beaches along the Condado area. Some of the major hotels offer starter courses with daily shore dives.

Vega Alta

25-50 ft
8-15 m

25-40 ft
8-12 m

Vega Alta's Cerro Gordo Beach has opportunity for shore diving and exploring off-shore reefs. 

Vieques

50-100 ft
15-30 m

43-90 ft
13-27 m

Coastal waters have virtually gone un explored. There's plenty of sea life, reefs, caves, walls and sunken wrecks.

 TOP

Tours and Charter Operators
Charter operators and tour guides for snorkeling and scuba diving trips are found all around the island. Excursions include day and night dives from a beach or boat. Most charter operators are owned and staffed by locals, so most know where to take you for the best dives. Most are highly qualified and have a NAUI- and/or PADI-certification. Ordinarily, trips are scheduled for novice divers as well as serious ones. Group tours are usually available. Check our sports data table for the tour operator nearest you.

 TOP

ATRÁS / BACK

ATRÁS / BACK

[ hogar ] [ información ] [ busqueda ] [ comentarios ] [ creditos ] [ propaganda ] [ dile a un amigo ] [ enlace a nuestro sitio ]
[
home ] [ information ] [ search ] [ feedback ] [ credits ] [ advertising ] [ tell a friend ] [ link to our site ]

 

Propiedad Literaria © 1998 - 2017.  Todos los derechos son reservados.
Copyright © 1998 - 2017.  All rights reserved.
Revisado /Revised: January 17, 2017